Reworking the plan

Reworking the plan

Remember what I said last blog about staying small and towing with the Durango? Yeah…. ain’t gonna happen. We simply miscalculated the towing capacity numbers and have thus far shot giant holes in our feet.

We have to “return” a new car. Really, you can only trade it in and lose money because of how quickly a car devalues.

We feel like giant schmucks.

The problem is we can’t tow anything with an SUV that would be comfortable for a family of three potentially on the road for up to a year. So that means we’re going to be truck people.

We’re buying a pickup truck. A gas guzzling, gigantic ridiculous pickup truck.

Our other car is a Prius. So you can imagine the difficulty I’m having visualizing myself behind the wheel of a Ram 2500. Alas, we have little choice.

The Nitty Gritty

For those of you starting to entertain the notion of an RV-living dream let me break it down for a sec.

Mobile homes, the kind where you drive in the front and the living space is in the back fall under three categories:

Classes A, B, and C.

Class A motorhomes are what most people think of when they hear “RV”. They can be BEASTS and are generally the priciest.

Class-A-RV-Diesel-Workhorse-Serrano-Motorhomes

The interiors can also look a lot like a Princess Cruise liner.

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Well, they all kinda do, actually.

Class B’s are basically big vans with a bathroom and a couple of beds in the back. Sometimes a cooking area.

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Finally, a class C is the kind with a “lip” over the cab area. That’s a bed up there.

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Not all recreational vehicles are equipped with an engine, however.

Your towable RV category includes Fifth Wheels, Toy Haulers, and Travel Trailers.

A Fifth Wheel also has a lip like the Class C, except that part would slide over the bed of a pickup truck.

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A Toy Hauler is a trailer equipped to carry motorbikes and ATVs and the like. You know….”toys”. The living space is usually well equipped though. You just have to share it with your toys. Haulers are towed behind a truck secured to a rear hitch.

slide-toy-hauler

Last, but not least, is the Travel Trailer. It’s usually lighter than a fifth wheel and more suitable for short term travel. It hitches to the back of a tow vehicle like the toy hauler.

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All of these are often fitted with “slide outs” which increase the living space once you’re parked but conveniently slide in for travel.

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Now that you know all the kinds of RV’s out there, if you think a travel trailer or fifth wheel is how you want to roll, the very first thing you’ll have to do is familiarize yourself with the vehicle capacity lingo. The key is understanding that a vehicle’s tow capacity is limited by its gross combined vehicle weight  (GCVW). 

In other words, if a truck is rated to tow 8,000lbs, the weight of the truck is 6,000lbs, and the GCVW is 14,000lbs, you absolutely cannot tow an RV that has a dry weight (the unloaded vehicle weight) of 8,000 lbs. You have to account for fuel, water, stuff and…people, presumably, that you will have on your truck. Usually, there is a limitation to the hitch weight also. That’s even more complicated and confusing.

We really began to question our intelligence when trying to figure this stuff out.  Read more here to school yourself on this important info if you want to avoid making our stupid mistake.

So, consequently, Matthew has been toiling all week online searching for the perfect towing truck…an activity that has only temporarily replaced the relentless search for the perfect RV. (Spoiler: it is definitely going to be bigger than the aforementioned Keystone). Fingers crossed there exists the perfect orchestration of needs and weight ratings!

The Purge Continues

Saturday is our first time as vendors at a flea market!

And most likely our last.

True to my previous admission to becoming a minimalist, I have been feverishly ridding myself of all things unnecessary to life and sustenance. I have posted in every Facebook local buy/sell/trade group that will have me, but things are going a little more slowly than I anticipated. My local Buy Nothing group has not only been a fantastic way to rehome my belongings and score random travel-appropriate things I do need to organize the RV, but it also has I introduced me to some wonderful, like-minded people.

I hope to report back with good news on the vehicle front and a successful flea market sale. Stay tuned!