Sweet Savannah

Sweet Savannah

“Moving” days are always a bit more involved than we expect. Cleaning up the trailer, emptying the tanks, hitching back up, packing up, all in all, takes about two and a half hours. Matt takes care of all the outside stuff and I clean inside and prepare the RV to bring the slides back in while Marcella plays.

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Then we hit the road for a maximum of five hours at a stretch with a break, (ideally only three hours though) timing it with Cella’s nap time so she’s asleep for at least an hour and a half stretch.

She was not cut out for car rides, this one. She doesn’t like being still and confined, so long car rides usually become stressful for us all while she screams and we try to distract her from her strappy prison.

We left Myrtle Beach around 10am and arrived at Skidaway Island State Park in Savannah by 2pm.

The drive into the park was jaw dropping. We were awestruck by the immense beauty of the giant Oak trees, dripping in Spanish moss, creating a canopy that envelopes you in its ancient wonder. They are simply stunning and other worldly organisms.

State Park RV accommodations tend to be a bit bare bones and lack luster compared to private campgrounds. Skidaway, however, is spacious, allowing each campsite beauty and privacy. It is also has “pull-through” sites, which is MUCH easier than the more standard “back-in” site.

Breathing in the mild, most air and wearing t-shirts for the first time allowed us to truly relax into a new life routine.

We took in the beauty around us in the trail systems, and finally started running and working out again. As well as walking and hiking every free moment we had.

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Enjoying the SightsSavannah

We toured downtown Savannah one afternoon, which has a ton of squares and a good vibe. We just expected more people out and about. Wish we had more time to explore!
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What’s it REALLY like living in an RV?

In case you’re wondering, we really didn’t need much of an adjustment period getting used to living smaller on the RV. Our instincts were correct:

We love living like this…for the most part.

For example, everything you need is super close to where you are at this very moment. There were so many times in our last house when I’d realized I needed something, oh, five floors down, or so, and I’d simply say, “Forget it.”

I have one spray bottle with cleaning solution (a mix of alcohol, water and essential oils) instead of an entire section of home dedicated to household cleaning products. I keep it under the bathroom sink and can wipe down the bathroom AND the kitchen, a second later.

Cleaning in general is much easier and quicker, and I’m more likely to do it more often now.

Cooking is also easy. I have three gas burners, and one grate that lifts up for a quick wipe.

We even have a double sink, which is super convenient for me since I never towel dry anything, so I use the other side as a drain board.

Our bedroom is tight and cozy and we’ve hit our heads on the over head light more than once, but hey, at least we were used to a queen bed already. A bedroom is for sleeping, not running laps, anyway.

Except for Cella’s room…which is also an awesome little playroom. It’s fully decorated and she seems to enjoy it just as much as any room to which she’s ever been confined. She would just rather be outside. She’s a born hiker and camper!

The biggest challenge, as Matthew and I would both agree, is the bathroom. Good thing we’re not giants. It’s VERY tight in there. Like an airplane bathroom. Two people cannot fit unless one is standing in the shower. We have several organizers hanging on the door and the wall, and I hit my head on the one on the door constantly.

Ok, I probably hit my head on a lot of things constantly. I’m pretty klutzy.

The sink is small, so every time I wash my face I splash water all over the counter top and it drips to the floor.

The tub is a step up, which feels so strange when you get it in, for some reason. The shower head is small, and when hung in its little holster, points to the outside of the shower.

But the good points are enough to make up for these inconveniences.  We really do have enough storage space for everything we need. I quite like having a foot-flush toilet. I think they should be standard.

There is a skylight above the shower, which makes daytime showering lovely. There is also a little moon-roof/fan combo above the toilet which is really effective.

In addition, having a little tub is great for giving Cella her baths. Most days I just shower her off rather quickly, but every few days she gets a sit-in bath and it is just the perfect size for her.

All in all, we thoroughly enjoyed these five days, and since my honey was none too pleased that I implied that I hated or week in the Carolinas, let me qualify my last blog by saying, I simply detest the cold and it was way colder than I expected. It still was a fun experience getting acclimated to our new life and sure beat the -5° temps in Philadelphia that week! Plus, Matthew had the longest stretch of time off, not counting Marcella’s birth, in his adult life. Even if he finds something to complain about on the rig, he’s eternally grateful for this life he’s created for himself.

Going forward, we’re excited to plan more campsites for longer periods to fully immerse into a new place. We have our next three stops already booked in Florida, but for only five days each since Florida is generally overtaken by snowbirds way in advance.

We’ll head down to Jupiter, just north of Palm Beach, then Salt Springs park in central Florida, and exit through the panhandle with a final stop by Pensacola. Matt was stationed there in the Marines and absolutely loved it.

Looking forward to beach time!